Reward for cold case death lead gives family hopeVideo, Gallery

Reward for cold case death lead gives family hope | Video, Gallery Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith
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Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Police Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd delivers the announcement. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Greens MLC David Shoebridge welcomes the announcement. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Family and friends of Mark Anthony Haines converge on Tamworth Police Station for the announcement of a $500,000 reward in relation to his cold case death. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

Smoking ceremony with the organs of Mr Haines back on his ancestral country. Photo: Ella Smith

TweetFacebookReward announcement at Tamworth Police StationPost by Reward announcement at Tamworth Police Station.

The family has never lost sight of justice, one day being served upon the person or persons responsible for Mark’s tragic death.

Craig CraigieMoving scenes as police and family of murdered man Mark Haines about to address media on 30th anniversary of his death @The_NDLpic.twitter南京夜网/b6zseYoYtf

— Ella Smith (@ellarbsmith) January 15, 2018Cousin of Mark Haines, Wayne Hippi, talks us through the artwork on the box that holds his organs 30 years since his death @The_NDLpic.twitter南京夜网/dsCqqpa7yR

— Ella Smith (@ellarbsmith) January 16, 2018Uncle of Mark Anthony Haines, Don Craigie, addresses service on 30th anniversary of his death in #[email protected]_NDLpic.twitter南京夜网/Dx9o43TYn0

— Ella Smith (@ellarbsmith) January 16, 2018

Another of Mr Haines’ uncles, Don Craigie, who’s been at the centre of public pleas for information, welcomed“the repatriation of Mark’s organs for reburial for cremation back in his ancestral lands where his body lays”.

“No family should have to go through the anguish of not knowing what has happened to their loved one,” Mr Craigie said.

Crime Stoppers1800 333 000Tamworth police(02) 6768 2999Lifeline 13 11 14Northern Daily Leader

New website helping parents create healthy lunches

HEALTHY LUNCHES: Adele Fiene and her son Franklin Fiene like Cancer Council’s new Healthy Lunch Box website. Picture: Adam McLeanAn interactive website has been launched ahead of the new school year to help Illawarra parents create a healthy lunch for their kids.
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Cancer Council NSW’s new Healthy Lunch Box website at healthylunchbox南京夜网419论坛includes recipesideas and tips.

Importantly it also features an interactive lunch box builder that enables parents and their kids to plan a healthy lunch box at home, or on the move with their smartphone or tablet.

This is music to the ears for Adele Fiene.

The Wollongong mother of two boys aged between three and five, saidit’s challenging finding things her sons’ will eat.

“Franklin is a really fussy eater and as a busy parent it’s quite hard finding time to prepare for lunches and finding foods that are easy to pack into a lunchbox that Franklin will eat,’’ Ms Fiene said.

Healthy lunch

‘’The Healthy Lunch Box website has been very useful. It has great variety and gives plenty of food ideas.

‘’The website makes packing a lunchbox interesting for my son and there’s food on the website that he is willing to give a go.

‘’The website expands ideas about what a school lunchbox can look like rather than simply a sandwich and a piece of fruit.There is a lot that is useful for busy parents. I really recommend it.’’

Adele Fiene

The website has been launched as part of Cancer Council NSW’s Eat It To Beat It program which runs free sessions and workshops across Illawarra for parents of primary aged school children, helping them to understand why fruit and vegetables are so important.

The Healthy Lunch Box shows Illawarra parents how easy it can be to add more fruit and veg and pack a lunch box that kids will love to eat while encouraging behaviour that has lifelong cancer prevention benefits.

Read more:8 tips to make a healthy school lunch your children will actually eat

Cancer Council NSW regional nutrition project officer Kelly Hayessaid alarmingly, only sevenper cent of NSW children eat enough vegetables and 22 per cent of children are overweight or obese.

Shesaid parents wanted quick and easy access to healthy recipes and inspiration on how to vary lunch box content.

‘’With one child eating about 2500 lunches throughout their years at school, many parents report that packing lunch boxes can be a chore, especially when it comes to getting kids enthusiastic about healthy options such as fruit and vegetables,’’ Ms Hayes said.

‘’Parents want to ensure they are providing their kids with the energy and nutrients they need to learn and play.’’

The website has been supported by OUTRUN CANCER (梧桐夜网outruncancer南京夜网) and the community.

Illawarra Mercury

NBN admits three in four FTTN customers won’t get top speeds

The National Broadband Network has admitted only one in four customers connecting through the most controversial technology in the mix will access its much-touted top speeds.
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The disclosure, to a parliamentary committee, comes as pressure is mounting for the government to write down the value of the multi-billion dollar project as it struggles to deliver the service that would underpin its financial worth and the taxpayer investment in it.

What the NBN response shows is that when the rollout concludes in 2020, three out of four fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) customers are not expected to be able to access its fastest download speeds, of 100 Mbps.

The controversial FTTN connection uses fibre to the nearest neighbourhood node and then uses copper wire for the rest of the journey to a consumer premise.

Consumers who have fibre to their premises (FTTP), fibre to their building (FTTB) or fibre running down their street (FTTC) customers are estimated to be able to utilise the top speed plans. !function(e,t,s,i){var n=”InfogramEmbeds”,o=e.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0],d=/^http:/.test(e.location)?”http:”:”https:”;if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=d+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var r=e.createElement(“script”);r.async=1,r.id=s,r.src=i,o.parentNode.insertBefore(r,o)}}(document,0,”infogram-async”,”https://e.infogram南京夜网/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js”);

Those most dependent on FTTN connections will be those in suburban and semi-rural areas as inner-city customers will usually access the NBN through existing pay TV or other cables (known as HFC). Geelong in Victoria is heavily dependent on FTTN connections as are some parts of outer Sydney.

An NBN Co spokeswoman said 90 per cent of customers accessing the NBN through the various wire methods (as opposed to satellite) would still be able to access speeds of up to 50 Mbps in 2020, with all able to access at least 25 Mbps.

Future network upgrades would also be funded with its forecast $5 billion annual revenues after roll-out, she said.

Currently, more than 80 per cent of NBN users are on speeds of 25 Mbps or less. Recent discounts offered to wholesalers by the NBN are expected to see more people shift towards a 50 Mbps speed plan.

This pricing shift has become part of a larger debate, with experts increasingly questioning the value of the network and tipping a possible write down from the government.

The government has ploughed $30 billion of public money into the NBN with a plan to eventually privatise the network to recoup the investment along with a return.

Any writedown would potentially jeopardise that plan.

A Macquarie Wealth Management note on Tuesday said it expected the “NBN pricing structure to continue to evolve, and the merits of writing down the NBN to continue to be debated”.

Price cuts announced in December could see the NBN considering “the long-term impacts of such a model if widely adopted”.

The note said a “catalyst” for a write-down could be a change in the NBN business model, or deteriorating economics from higher building costs, delays and lower than anticipated take-up, or a combination of these factors.

In a document outlining its investment strategy, wealth management firm Morgans said a write down was required to “make the NBN work” and to bring down costs.

It considered the NBN a “great social investment” but a “poor financial investment” due to lower customer take-up and lower revenue per customer than the NBN had forecast thanks to competing technologies that sometimes offered better speeds more cheaply.

Its calculations suggest the last mile access price needs to be cut back to pre-NBN levels of $15 a month – from $43 now, and a $52 medium-term target. The last mile is the final stretch of wires that connects homes to the wider network.

“Essentially, this would require a large portion of the NBN’s capital base to be written off,” the report says, speculating it is “equally conceivable that our current Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, could write down the NBN to improve the consumer outcome and attract votes”.

In December, JPMorgan analyst Eric Pan also called for a restructure saying it would be in the best interest for the public if the government required a lower return on investment and could focus on service over profitability.

To do so would “likely” involve a write-down.

Ord Minnett research from December outlined a possible write-down in a “long-term scenario”.

Most analysts predicted upwards movement for the share price of telcos if this happened.

Despite the growing chorus pushing for a write-down, minister for finance Mathias Cormann said there was “no basis” for it.

He said the investment could only be written down in line with accounting standards, which required the NBN Co to assess that it was required.

“The NBN has determined independently that a writedown is not appropriate at this time,” he said.

“There seems to be some confusion by some about the relationship between the valuation of NBN and the internal rate of return.”

Opposition communications minister Michelle Rowland said a writedown was not about accounting rules but “whether it would help to strike a better balance for consumers, taxpayers, industry and the broader economy”.

Another expert calling for a write-down, telecommunications consultant and former advisor to the UN Broadband Commission Paul Budde, said it was “firmly” on the agenda.

He pointed to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s late-2017 comments that an “asset revaluation” may be needed to enable the NBN Co to charge lower prices.

Using figures from a 2016 report from auditing firm PwC, which indicated the NBN might only be worth $27 billion when complete, and his own calculations, he predicted a 50 per cent write-down.

About $30 billion of the cost to build has come from taxpayers.

Mr Budde encouraged telcos to “mediate the politics” in 2020 when the NBN is rolled out to create an “official industry-led commission”.

The major telcos have also queried the financial viability of the NBN.

When asked about whether industry-led action could be on the cards, John Stanton, chief executive of industry body Communications Alliance, said it was “vitally interested … in the nature of access technologies and how they combine with commercial arrangements”.

The alliance was working with the NBN on “a raft of” future options. He would not make comment about a write-down.

The NBN Co would not provide figures on how many premises would be connected by FTTN in 2020, with the figure included with FTTB in its corporate plans.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Macron seeks solution to the ‘road of misery’ that ends in Calais

London: French President Emmanuel Macron is trying to arm-twist the UK government into accepting more refugees to help clear out Calais’ notorious migrant camps – and Brexit is his ace in the hole.
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In a key speech on migration in Calais on Tuesday, Macron said the interests of the Calais region “will be fully taken into consideration” when preparing France’s position on Brexit and on any potential future trade and customs deal with the UK.

Though he was explicitly referring to fishing, logistics and industry sectors, one of the region’s biggest issues is that it has become a bottleneck for migrants from places such as Afghanistan and East Africa wishing to cross the Channel.

New concessions won by Macron may be announced at a summit on Thursday with British Prime Minister Theresa May at the Sandhurst military academy.

The Times newspaper reported a source “at the French presidency” claiming May had “bowed to pressure” from Macron to put migration on the summit agenda, and the French were pushing her to agree to a taskforce to pick up unaccompanied migrant children from the Calais area and accelerate their transfer across the Channel.

There have been ugly clashes between police and migrants around Calais. Macron used his speech to denounce the use of tear gas and physical violence against migrants, saying no breaches of professional ethics by police would be tolerated.

“Calais is a land of passage, which has become a dead end for thousands of women and men who have spent years on the road,” Macron said.

He said France’s “duty is to protect those who are persecuted and are seeking asylum”.

“A person who flees a country at war should not have to face roads of misery, and sometimes the violence of slavery,” he said.

However there was also a duty to “protect the Republic,” he said.

“Everyone needs to know [that] everything is being done to prevent the illegal passage [of migrants] to Britain,” Macron said.

Visiting a migrant reception centre near Calais, he told refugees and local officials that in France “it’s impossible to integrate millions and millions of people, but we have this duty to protect people when they are at risk”.

Macron has taken a tough line on what he calls “economic migrants”, with a new immigration bill to be debated this year aimed at speeding up the handling of asylum applications and the expulsion of those whose claims are rejected.

Macron’s stance has split his government and party.

On Tuesday, a group of intellectuals and trade unionists – including Jean Pisani-Ferry, who wrote Macron’s election policy on the economy – published a letter in Le Monde saying Macron’s migration policies “contradict the humanism that you propose”.

Under Macron, France was “a country that is snatching blankets from migrants in Calais. Where people are lacing up their tents on the streets of Paris. Where people are getting lost, their hands and feet frozen, on the snowy slopes of the French-Italian border,” the letter said.

“Eritreans, Sudanese and Syrians, humiliated in their country, tortured in Libya, exploited by criminal traffickers, terrorised on the Mediterranean, who entered Europe through Greece or Italy, could soon be deprived of liberty in France.”

They said if Macron did not live up to his ideals he would add to a “stone wall of moral indifference that grows everywhere on our continent”.

Macron has a strong negotiating position at the Sandhurst summit – he would prove a vital ally for May in this year’s Brexit trade talks. And he may also threaten to withdraw from the Le Touquet treaty, under which Britain is allowed to run border checks on French territory, effectively moving its border across the Channel and keeping unwanted migrants off British soil.

Macron is also expected to push for more money and resources from Britain to deal with the migrant flow into Calais.

“In no case will we allow another Jungle to be established in Calais,” he said in his Tuesday speech.

Macron’s predecessor Francois Hollande ordered the dismantling of the notorious, unsanitary and unsafe Jungle camp in October 2016, moving its then 7000 inhabitants into official accommodation.

But around 500-700 migrants continue to camp out in the town’s margins, trying to stow away on trucks bound for Britain.

Last year, migrants made 115,000 attempts to cross the Channel, according to a French presidency source quoted in the Times. This was 50,000 fewer than the year before.

Whitehall has yet to show its cards in advance of the UK-France summit, however Fairfax Media understands the UK government is opposed to an end or re-negotiation of the Le Touquet agreement, arguing that it is in the interests of both countries, and that Britain has already provided significant help in beefing up security at Calais.

The summit will include discussions on the 50-year defence and security treaty between the two countries signed in 2010.

Looking towards Brexit, the UK government also wants to expand conversations beyond defence.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

‘Breaking point’: $84m development plan for northern beaches golf course

The tree-lined fairways of Bayview golf course are usually peaceful except for the sound of woods and irons hitting golf balls.
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But a proposal to build a retirement village on part of the golf course on Sydney’s northern beaches has put Bayview Golf Club on a collision course with its neighbours.

A spokesman for residents opposed to the development, Christopher Fletcher, said it would destroy an important wildlife corridor.

“Apart from a wide variety of flora, there are at least eight species native to the site listed as endangered or vulnerable including the powerful owl, black cockatoo and [a] microbat colony,” he said.

The $84 million development submitted by Waterbrook Bayview Pty Ltd proposes seven buildings up to four storeys high housing 95 apartments plus basement parking for 186 cars off Cabbage Tree Road in Bayview.

The retirement village, which is intended to be built on land sold by the golf club for $10 million, also features a cafe, restaurant, winery, hair salon and gym, with nursing services provided to residents.

The proposed development seeks to reconfigure the golf course to accommodate the retirement village and raise sections of the course to improve “playability” and reduce the risk of flood.

It also proposes the removal of more than 150 trees, mitigated by “significant revegetation” of the site.

Residents of the retirement village would be given membership of the club, which opened in 1929.

David Stone, the general manager of Bayview Golf Club, said the “real purpose” of the development “is to provide the resources to do things that a not-for-profit northern beaches, locals golf club could not hope to afford”.

It comes after the club was put in a “fragile financial position” after its board decided in 2007 to build a new clubhouse at a cost of $7.2 million.

“The decision to divert the club’s resources to a new clubhouse, in combination with the financial losses the club incurs annually from lost playing days resulting from inclement weather and poor drainage and floor mitigation, has left it in a fragile financial position,” according to the development application.

Mr Stone said the northern beaches had a growing population of people over the age of 65, yet an undersupply of seniors living accommodation – a claim disputed by Mr Fletcher who said the area already had a number of aged-care facilities.

Mr Fletcher also said the development should be knocked back because the area’s “existing infrastructure is already at breaking point”.

An online petition calling on the NSW Planning Minister, Anthony Roberts, to ban development on the site to protect vulnerable species has attracted more than 3500 signatures.

A letter attached to the petition and addressed to Mr Roberts and two of his ministerial colleagues states: “There are no benefits at all for the local community, other than a financial benefit for the private golf club members.”

A website created by opponents states the golf course is the wrong place to build a retirement village: “The Liberals’ one-size-fits-all approach to planning the growth of our city fails to take into account the unique character of areas like Bayview.

“We need a planning system that allows these unique areas to flourish with appropriate development, without being lost in a sea of high-rise apartments.”

The proposed retirement village has been plagued with controversy – the NSW Department of Planning and Environment refused to give the development the green light in 2015 because of issues associated with building design, flooding and ecology.

A revised proposal, which reduced building heights and the number of apartments as well as taking account of environmental concerns was approved by the DPE in 2016, which issued a site compatibility certificate under the State Environmental Planning Policy for Seniors Housing.

The Liberal member for Pittwater, Education Minister Rob Stokes, expressed concerns about the proposed development in 2017, telling the Manly Daily: “It is not an appropriate place for multistorey residential apartment buildings.”

However, Mr Stokes, a former planning minister, said in a statement to the Herald that he expected concerns about the development to be “carefully examined”.

“Whilst a number of changes have been made since the original proposal, I appreciate that concerns remain regarding the placement and height of the proposed buildings,” he said.

The development application is on public exhibition until February 12. It will be assessed by Northern Beaches Council, which will provide a report with recommendations to the Sydney North Planning Panel.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.